Cloud, Microsoft, Technology, Uncategorized, VMware

Prepare Your Business for Windows 7 End of Life


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Why would you ever change a good thing? Because of end of life, that’s why. Grab your tissues, we’re delving into the topic that’s provoking international furore and mourning; the painful issue of Windows 7 end of life. When it comes to desktop and laptop operating systems for both personal and professional use, Windows 7 has been number one since its release in 2009. Originally intended to be an incremental upgrade to Microsoft Windows, especially after the disaster that was Windows Vista three years prior, it maintains hardware and software compatibility. A major improvement to its predecessor, Windows 7 quickly won the hearts of every computer user worldwide. Sadly, tech hard- and software are not designed to last, and it was only a matter of time before it would see end of life. Though Microsoft has tried to ease the public into the idea of something bigger and better with the release of Windows 8 (which didn’t go down as well as expected) and Windows 10 (which just isn’t Windows 7), the truth is, frankly, hard to swallow.

“But why?” you sob, “We don’t have to let it go, no one would know!” Unfortunately, it doesn’t quite work like that. Well, it could, but it would open your organisation to all of the nasties that would just love the chance to infiltrate your system. The main problem here is support. You might be surprised to hear that mainstream support for Windows 7 ended all the way back in 2015, which means that Microsoft hasn’t been releasing feature update and service packs since then. That might give you some hope, but alas, I’m here to dash those completely. The only reason that you’ve been safely able to use Windows 7 up until now was thanks to the security patches released through the extended support period, which will end on the 14th January 2020.

Technically, you could continue to use Windows 7 after the extended support period, but the risk of a cyberattack would be significantly higher, and you’d have to ask yourself if it would be worth the risk. Microsoft won’t be taking any responsibility for any security breaches that happen to a Windows 7 operating system after the end of life date, and any breach could land you in deep water (and a deeper fine) in terms of the new GDPR regulations. The issue with end of life is the loss of the security updates that fix vulnerabilities that hackers exploit. Any new computer viruses and malware being created would be far more advanced compared to the old security patches. Why put so much money and time into protecting your business data only to leave your organisation wide open to any cyber attack that happens to be the goût du jour? You might think that 14th of January is miles away. And it is, but in terms of IT it’s not long at all.

So, if ever it was time for a spring clean, now would be it! The more time you have to plan, the less disruption your IT team and end users are likely to experience, which is likely to happen if your software is incompatible with your new operating system. Compatibility is likely to be an issue here, as is old hardware (oh look, a new reason for your printer to refuse to cooperate) and your legacy systems. Since it’s effectively changing the very foundation on which your laptops and desktops rely on, it’s important to make sure that your systems remain interoperable with one another. Some applications might have newer, more compatible versions available which will work flawlessly on your updated operating system. Another option is to move your legacy applications to a virtualised computing environment, easing the change. Before jumping straight into an OS change, it’s important to have a strategy in place to prevent everything from going a bit pie-shaped and cause any more tears. The good news is, if you’re relying on a cloud-hosted system, upgrading your operating system shouldn’t be much of an issue at all.

With the release of Windows 10, Microsoft has introduced the ‘evergreen’ Windows as a service model. This is a complete revolution in terms of OS, and it has launched the idea of a ‘final’ desktop release. Instead of having to migrate to new versions every three years, Windows 10 will continuously update every six months or so, providing continued support and patched security. With shorter release periods (only 18 months now), Windows 10 can’t be treated like a traditional version. To make things that much easier, it’s now possible for an in-place upgrade, meaning that you don’t need to migrate your data and reinstall all of your programs. Windows 10 provides plenty of new features for users when compared to Windows 7, such as Windows Autopilot, which automatically provisions and enrols your device when you sign in, provided that you’re connected to the internet.

January 14th next year will be an incredibly sad day for the millions of Windows 7 users who have so far refused to move on. We’re expecting a world-wide shortage of tissues, ice cream and Windows 10, a resounding wail of “Not Windows 7! What is this Windows 10 malarkey?” reverberating in the crisp January air. Here at Cetus we know that change is scary and unwanted. We feel the pain of saying goodbye to Windows 7, but know that when it comes to your organisation, we will help ease all parties into the next operating system step. Make sure to have a chat with our experts, who will provide the tissues during this painful time, and every other OS change in the future. If you want the most in-depth info and latest tips, make sure to register for our exclusive hands-on workshop with VMware in May.

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

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