Check Point

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Check Point, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Here Phishy, Phishy, Phishy….


No Comments

A couple of weeks ago, there was a mandatory ‘here’s how to help keep the company from falling prey to cyber attacks’ lecture at Cetus. We all trooped downstairs, cramming into one of our board rooms, mugs clinking and teas sloshing. One of the lovely ladies from Barclays came in to give us a word of warning- or forty- on how to spot nefarious activity and not fall prey to a scam. By the end of it we were all ready to delete our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts, never use an ATM, and I seriously started questioning my role within social media. It was quite the terrifying afternoon. Between social engineering, ransomware and phishing, it’s a miracle we all aren’t in debt from scammers. But the most terrifying aspect was learning just how prevalent phishing attacks are.

Big ransomware scams make the news constantly- splashed across the news, Sharon from HR standing at the water cooler to share the details in whispers to anyone who passes by- but phishing is the bigger threat here. In reality, a ransomware attack usually only demands several hundreds of pounds from the organisation it invades, while a phishing scam generally scams thousands of pounds from the victim. Not only that, but it’s easier for the cyber criminal to carry out a phishing attack. Now that I’ve given you something short of a heart attack (sorry), let’s turn this around shall we? Here are a few key ways of keeping you off the phisherman’s hook.

Beware of the sender
It doesn’t really matter whether it’s personal or corporate, receiving an email either makes you want to go on an extended holiday or celebrate. At work you’re usually too busy opening and replying in record time to get on with the mountain of tasks that grows with every email. It’s fair to say that you don’t always check who the sender is. I mean, we’re all weary of any Arabian Prince trying to get into contact, but aside from that we’re pretty chill for the most part. If they’ve gone to the trouble of finding your email address (I still can’t figure out how people manage to find me) then chances are they really need to chat, right?

Depending on how much of a nightmare you are in life, you probably won’t know the hacker. So before you jump into your emerging pile of unopened emails, take a quick look. If you suddenly get an email from someone you don’t speak to regularly on the topic of something that you don’t normally think about, be slightly weary. Check the sender’s address- does it look a bit weird? Is there a random ‘0’ instead of an ‘O’? Could that ‘i’ actually be Vietnamese character ‘ỉ’? Is there an extra letter or number in the address that shouldn’t be there? If you see one of these little tricks, bonus points for your great eyesight, and definitely get the email checked out.

‘I get scammed with a little help from my friends’
Did the email check out, but you’re still not 100% sure if you need to detonate your computer immediately to avoid any viruses escaping through the network? Take a quick look at the list of people that received the email. Do you know them? Is it a strange group, ie the sales group being added one name at a time instead of the group link? The cyber criminal might be targeting a large number of people in your organisation, so if you see people on the list that you wouldn’t normally be in contact with, or from a department that has nothing to do with yours, be extra careful.

Bit of a dodgy subject line
Aside from Sharon’s bi-monthly suggestion for drinks in the pub across the way after work on a Monday night, you should really only be getting emails that directly relate to your job function. That is, unless you’re in marketing- we seem to get our noses into plenty of unrelated jobs. If you’re getting emails about things that you know you’re not privy to or they make absolutely no sense to you, don’t open it. If it’s not spam, it’ll be malware. If you do happen to open it (oopsie), check if the email is a reply to one that you didn’t send. Does the message match the subject line? A misalignment of the two should send up an army of red flags. Also, while we all have the office oddball that likes to reply to emails at 3am, is it normal to be receiving this email from this sender at this particular hour?

Attachments and hyperlinks of doom
We’ve all opened random attachments or clicked on hyperlinks that we weren’t quite sure about and sighed with relief when it was just a video of cats acting strangely. We know we shouldn’t, but that curiosity can’t be helped. Besides, it could be important, or cats, after all. A few things to check before you right click; did you expect the attachment? Is it a common file type that you would normally receive? Does it have a weird name, or strange symbols in the file name? If you answer yes to these, maybe don’t open it. It’s quite likely to be malicious.

Not quite what you were expecting?
If you receive an email that contains unsettling, startling or urgent content that requires immediate action on your part, it’s most likely a phishing attack. There have been so many of these popping up recently, panicking the nation. At the moment, a common scam is an email from your bank claiming that your account has been hacked and you need to login straightaway, or even move the rest of your funds to another account. For the Netflix lovers among you, there have also been emails being received saying that billing information needs to be updated. Don’t fall for it. If the email includes a link to login or change account details, be extra weary. Don’t use links, web addresses or phone numbers.

Keeping yourself protected from any cyber crime can be a scary business, but even more so when it’s something you could very well unwillingly stumble into. It takes more than trusting your spam filter to keep yourself safe, having a strong cyber security solution is crucial. We work very closely with Check Point to craft solutions that stand tall against phishing, ransomware bots and all kind of nasties, using their SandBlast advanced endpoint threat prevention. Have a chat with our experts to see how we can whisk some cyber security into your perfect infrastructure solution so that it’s one less thing you need to worry about.

Speak to an expert

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Check Point, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Skyscraper: When Cyber Security Goes Wrong


No Comments

It was one of the biggest blockbusters of the summer. Dwayne Johnson’s Skyscraper thriller grossed $304.1 million during the hottest summer in living memory. Honestly, it probably would have made more, but for the fact that half of the UK population was sitting in any available patch of sun with a beer in their hands. I was one of those people, although with fruity cocktails instead. That was when I wasn’t in the office writing witty blog posts on Citrix Workspace, of course. Alas, while I had every intention on going to see the film, I never got around to it. So it was my pleasure, two Saturdays before Christmas, to snuggle in my pjs and pop it on (I lead the most exciting life when I’m not in the office). Well. While it’s action-packed with an interesting futuristic spin, I couldn’t help but spend the whole movie pointing out, sadly to no one in particular (I’m going to have to get a cat), all the various cyber security blunders that Johnson’s character made. Not one to waste my breath, or a good writing idea, I’m going to lay it all out in this blog post so that you can giggle along with me. Before we go any further though, there may be a spoiler or two, you have been warned.

In a nutshell, Johnson plays ex-FBI hostage-negotiator-turned-private-security-expert Will Sawyer, who gets called to Hong Kong in order to assess the security of the world’s tallest skyscraper. The Pearl, 225 stories and a whopping 1,100 metres tall, needs an inspection of the upper residential half before it can be opened to tenants. Since we are, after all, living through the ‘IOT for all of the things!’ revolution, no matter how mundane the appliance, it’s no surprise that the Pearl was built with tech in mind. It’s basically a giant computer, full of safety features and automations that make living and working there slightly more exciting than your average building. We saw absolutely zero evidence of it, but I’m still sure the lights turn on and off by clapping your hands. Anywho, we see Sawyer being given a tablet that controls the entirety of the 225 floors and shooed out of the door to go inspect the offsite security centre that controls the skyscraper. The tablet, obviously, isn’t in his possession for long, as it gets robbed by a group of terrorists who succeed in burning down the $200 billion structure with it. The sad part is, if the IT department had deployed a better cyber security solution, it could all have been avoided. Typical.

Who needs an effective authentication method, am I right?! This was mistake number one. For some incomprehensible reason, the only way of unlocking the tablet that controls the entirety of the building is via facial recognition. That’s it. Sure, in cinematographical terms this looks the best. It’s impressive and futuristic, suave and savvy. It’s every nerd’s dream. And facial recognition as part of multi-factor authentication is really effective. In the blink of an eye, it can analyse billions of tiny little markers on your face to unlock your device. But who on earth would think that it would be enough? For god’s sake, just signing into my Facebook requires my password, mother’s maiden name, list of my three favourite chocolate bars (in order) and the promise of my firstborn. Truth be told, facial recognition alone was irresponsible, and about as effective of protecting all that important data as using ‘1234567’ as a password. Hell, put a photo of Sawyer in front of the camera and that would probably fool it. There are so many effective ways to authenticate identity (I wrote an entire post on it). Why not have a secondary form of authentication, like having a password activate on Sawyer’s smartphone? That would have been clever.

Mistake number two; not informing the IT department of the breach. Err, this should have been the first point of call when Sawyer’s tablet got robbed. Instead, being the idiot that he is, he threw caution to the wind and went running off to save his family. Just one minute on the phone to IT and they could have stopped the disaster that was about to unfold. A good cyber security solution would have removed access to the tablet in a couple of clicks, rendering the terrorists’ efforts moot. In fact, it would have taken no time at all to wipe the data clean from the device, essentially turning it into an expensive, albeit sleek-looking, paperweight. It does echo a current issue facing organisations in terms of cyber security; the majority of security breaches come from employees who, inadvertently or not, allow the threat to infiltrate the network. This can happen from clicking on a dodgy link in an email (it’s sadly not a video of cats acting strangely)- in fact, phishing attacks are more prevalent and more likely to scam large sums of money from an organisation. Realistically, in this situation, Sawyer seriously neglected his responsibility to inform the IT department. While he undoubtedly performed some incredible gymnastics and it was thoroughly enjoyable to watch, I would have loved to hear his rationale when all was said and done. I doubt he’d be hired to assess the security of a paper bag after that!

The moral of this story is, and I’m sure it’s what director Rawson Marshall Thurber wanted to portray; don’t let your organisation become the Pearl and burn down to the ground- make sure your cyber security solution ticks all the boxes. We work closely with Check Point to incorporate secure technology into our solutions, effectively avoiding the risks that we saw Sawyer facing in the film, and many more besides. Have a chat with our cyber security solution experts here at Cetus, and in the meantime book yourself in for one of our complimentary security posture reviews!

Speak to an expert

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Check Point, Cloud, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

The Cyber Security Threats You Need to Plan for in 2019


No Comments

It’s that time of year again; time to be weary of scary things jumping out on your screen when you’re least expecting it, of monsters following you into your dreams and escaping from your [data] closet. I’m referring, of course, to National Cyber Security Month, the month to take extra care when it comes to protecting your organisation from cyber-gremlins. And I’m sure you’ve been hearing about it non-stop for the last three weeks; participating in the office games, including ‘bobbing for malware’, ‘pin the data on the phishing attempt’ and ‘pass the ransomware’. All party classics. Regardless, it’s an important issue that gets pushed to the side all too often throughout the year. So now is the time to make that extra bit of effort to make sure that you’re protected should the Big Bad Cyber-attack knock on your door (or make you realise just how badly your straw house was lacking).

To switch things up a bit, I thought it would be clever to start thinking about what lies ahead, when the dark, cold nights and endless Christmas parties make way for snow in April. Now is a good time to start planning for 2019, and what the cyber landscape might look like next year. I’ve dusted off my crystal ball and called upon the spirit of Google to tell me exactly what cyber security threats we’re most likely to hear about next year. So buckle up, take notes, and be prepared to impress your boss with your savvy goal-setting ambitions. You’re welcome in advance.

It seems like the world spent the entirety of 2018 running around trying to put out phishing fires. Unless you live under a rock, or are lucky enough to spend your days on a wifi-less beach, you can’t have missed the crazy number of phishing attacks that were publicised. Every second cyber security article had details of attacks and startling statistics (76% of businesses reported being a victim of an attack in 2018 so far). Alas, while phishing has been around since 1980, it has just been ramping up in popularity and severity over the last year or so. When it comes to internal threats, it’s by far the easiest way to get access to sensitive information. According to a Verizon report, 30% of phishing attacks get opened by American users, with 12% of those targeted by the emails clicking on the infected links or attachments. The element of human error makes it that much more appealing. Unfortunately, the only solution to phishing (for the time being anyway) is to train your users to be extra vigilant when opening emails from external sources, and make sure your spam filters are extra strong.

Here’s an interesting (albeit worrying) one; your new smartphone being compromised before it even gets in your hands. Malware is another one of those evil little buggers that can really cause trouble if you’re not very careful. Like phishing, it’s becoming a prevalent part of the internet landscape that users have to be wary about, kind of like not playing in traffic and eating your vegetables. In a society where being always-on is a necessity, mobile phones have become replacements for desktop computers. Think about it, what do you store or have access to on your laptop that you don’t on your phone? The data your phone collects on a daily basis is a very attractive target for cybercriminals. But the modern cybercriminal doesn’t have to stand on a street corner and ‘accidentally’ bump against you to steal your mobile, and ergo your data. Apps are an easy hands-free way to bypass security measures and cause trouble without even clicking on a malicious link. There have even been reports of smartphones leaving the factory floor with malware built in! This malware, called Cosiloon, can send users to download dodgy apps that they didn’t intend on accessing. The app is passive, only visible to the user in the settings section, but then connects with a website to grab the payloads that hackers want to install on the phone.

Speaking of phones, surprise, surprise; cryptocurrency is going to continue to be a massive deal in 2019. And since it is, the dollar signs in the eyes of hackers are getting even bigger. Cryptomining was a new trend for 2018, but without a doubt will gain traction during the next year. Uber-clever cybercriminals infect machines to commandeer their CPU power and steal Bitcoin. What we will most likely see in 2019 is the rise of cryptomining through mobile devices. Since cybercriminals need the infected device to be running to access the processing power, it only makes sense for them to move onto always-on mobile devices. Clever, huh? Many hackers simply create useful and legitimate apps, such as calculators, music videos or voice recording technology, and then embed a script that allows the cryptomining plugin to work silently in the background (don’t start getting any ideas). Since the nature of mobile is to simply make everything so damn complicated and finicky, you probably wouldn’t even notice the extra tab on your browser. The only thing that would indicate that you were a potential victim would be the quick-draining battery. But let’s face it, how often would you attribute awful battery life to a hacker, rather than just having an older phone? “You’d need terrible mobile security!” you might guffaw, pitying the idiot commoner that wouldn’t think of protecting their mobile devices (oops, that would be me). Alas, cryptomining doesn’t technically compromise the security of the device, as it doesn’t bypass security systems or install any rogue software. If you think you’re being clever by installing app-only or endpoint-based security solutions, you won’t be the one laughing (I don’t feel so bad then).

CheckPoint’s SandBlast Mobile is one fabulous piece of software that can and will protect your mobile devices. It protects users from threats to the OS, apps and network, and boasts the industry’s highest threat catch rate. Zero-day malware, using a software vulnerability for which there isn’t any available fix or defence at the moment, is being created and released onto unsuspecting victims every day. SandBlast Mobile blocks zero-day malware (I think it’s magic, actually), and prevents phishing on your apps. If you’re worried about infected devices accessing corporate data, it will intuitively block the device, while also blocking infected devices from sending on sensitive data to botnets. Possibly the most innovative feature of SandBlast Mobile is how it mitigates threats without having to rely on a management platform, which means that you’re protected even when you might not be on the ball (mobile attacks can also happen after late nights- you can’t have Spidey senses all the time!). Regardless of what you do or access on your mobile, if you work from your phone- even if it’s just to reply to emails- SandBlast Mobile is the all-encompassing solution for you. Well then, we can pretty much strike off two of those potential 2019 issues with just one technology!

We’re all for embracing the future here at Cetus. There is so much to look forward to, and so many awesome new technologies- both malicious and not- that will come about, regardless of how well you try to prepare. Working with CheckPoint, we feel reassured that our cyber security is covered, regardless of time, place or device. If you’re interested in what our experts have to say about all the cool things that CheckPoint offer, you can have a chat with them with here. And don’t forget to tell us what you think; what will 2019 have to offer by way of cyber security threats?

Speak to an expert

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Check Point, Cloud, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Cyber Criminals are at Gen-V; Are You?


No Comments

Since the dawn of the internet, we’ve learned that keeping our sensitive information under lock and key is important. Even more so nowadays, with the explosion of ecommerce asking for everything short of your National Insurance number. And nine times out of ten you can choose to save your card details for the next time you’re feeling too lazy to get out of bed to grab your wallet. If you really think about it, that’s probably not the best thing to do. But while putting our bank accounts at risk, you’d expect big corporations who have entire qualified, skilled and experienced IT teams to have a handle on their security, right?

Oh boy, could you be any more wrong. In a recent CheckPoint survey, 97% of the organisations that were assessed were not prepared for a Gen-V cyber attack. The thing is, cyber-attacks and security protections have evolved significantly in the last 30 years, but not at equal levels. Currently, organisations are at Gen-III. We fell into Gen-III in the early 2000s, when attackers learned to leverage vulnerabilities in the components of an IT infrastructure. This includes operating systems, hardware and applications. A fantastic example was the SQLSlammer worm. Since then, Gen-IV has emerged in 2010 as cyber criminals became more sophisticated, targeting the world of finance, where sandboxing and anti-bot were the main protections.

Back in 2017, the dreaded Gen-V cyber attack made a roaring entrance with the world-shattering WannaCry ransomware attack. We’re looking at large-scale, multi-vector attacks, using uber-sophisticated attack tools. It’s safe to say that we’re not in Kansas anymore. These attacks are major, generally using ‘state-sponsored’ technologies that can target networks across countries, companies and even continents. Cyber criminals are getting their hands on these technologies from simple leaks or as a result of reverse engineering, and cause major reputational damage for the organisations affected.

So what can be done? The risk of a security threat is omnipresent. No matter what you do, your organisation will be exposed in one way or another (unless you favour the slate-and-chalk method of working).

Check Point’s Infinity is one of the best ways to handle the stress of cyber security. Focusing on prevention instead of detection, it’s a hyper-aware platform that provides consolidated security across networks, cloud and mobile. Combining a single security platform, pre-emptive threat protection capabilities and a unified system for management. With the release of R80.10, it features plenty of clever capabilities and enhancements which include unique policy layers, security multi-zones and boosted performance, to ensure security management. With the move to cloud earmarked for most organisations, the integrated Check Point vSEC Cloud Security’s comprehensive portfolio integrates with both private and public cloud platforms, so you’re covered regardless of your cloud preferences.

Infinity also boasts an impressive threat prevention in the form of anti-ransomware technology that enables businesses to remain protected against even the most sophisticated ransomware and cyber extortion. If your organisation is big into mobile (whose isn’t?), SandBlast mobile has the intelligence to detect both known and unknown malware, effectively blocking it before it becomes a problem. You’ll never have to worry about poisoned wi-fi networks, ‘man-in-the-middle’ attacks or SMS phishing. There are so many nifty features of Infinity that make it a clever investment for an organisation, no matter its size. Centre stage, it has centralised management and role-based administration that allows it to apply to all organisation use cases.

Gen-V will certainly not be the last upgrade in cyber security. As technology improves, expanding and intruding into more and more of our lives, the sophistication of cyber criminals will progress just as fast. It won’t be long until I’m writing about a major Gen-VI cyber-attack and its implications affecting another group of international organisations. So now is the time to start getting ahead of the hackers. We work hand-in-hand with Check Point to ensure that your infrastructure is at the highest level of cyber security so you don’t need to worry about that.

Speak to an expert

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Check Point, Cloud, IT Solutions, Our Upcoming Events, Security, VMware

WannaCry: What We’ve Learned One Year On


4 Comments

It felt like the world was held to ransom. All over the globe – an astounding 150 countries in fact -, little red boxes popped up on computer screens, causing dread and havoc. ‘Ooops, your files have been encrypted!’ they read, asking for between $300 and $600 (£230 to £470) in bitcoin for the safe release of the files. On Friday May 12th 2017 nations of the world collectively gasped as these faced the most devastating and widespread cyber security incident at that time. Over 200,000 machines were affected, with the perpetrators scamming over $112,000.

In Britain, the NHS was hit the hardest. The little red WannaCry pop-up appeared at 1pm on the screens of only four trusts, demanding the ransom. By 4pm, when the ‘kill switch’ was accidentally found, it had spread to 16 trusts. The cyber-attack threat was officially ‘stepped down’ by NHS England a week later, but not before the affected reached a staggering 80 out of 236 hospital trusts as well as 603 primary care and affiliate NHS organisations. Public health in the UK was seriously affected, since the ransomware attack resulted in thousands of cancelled appointments, infected systems and the diversion of A&E patients to other hospitals.

In hindsight, and a little bit of digging, it was a disaster waiting to happen. The NHS had been warned as far back as 2014 that their level of cyber security just wouldn’t cut it. With a failure to undertake the most basic of IT security procedures, which included patching and updating software, as well as not putting a strategy in place to properly deal with a cyber security incident, it’s a miracle that it didn’t happen sooner. But it was a huge wake-up call, not only to the NHS but to businesses globally. No longer would cyber security rest on the hopes of a flimsy firewall that hadn’t been updated in several years – this is a real risk, with significant consequences. So, in the year since WannaCry, what exactly have we learned?

It’s horrifying to think that WannaCry was a Gen-V cyber threat, while according to Check Point’s Cyber Security Generations Survey from March 2018, only 10% of IT security professionals are at Gen-IV and, worse still, only 3% are at Gen-V.

According to a recent report by cyber security firm Tanium, most organisations would still be unprepared should another incident like WannaCry happen again. The survey of 500 frontline IT security workers in the UK is shocking; 40% admit that their organisation is even more exposed than last year. Only 31% confessed that their organisation had invested in new security systems since WannaCry. As I stated already slightly higher up, it was basic IT security procedures that were the gateway for WannaCry, yet a staggering 66% of the IT security workers admitted that they still hadn’t improved their patch management process.

The results are definitive; it’s time to start safeguarding against further, potentially more devastating, cyber-attacks.

It’s all about the patching
WannaCry sneaked through a Windows weakness where there was a lack of security. Shockingly, it had been discovered and there had been a patch for the offending loophole two months before the attack. I know having to update is a major pain, but guys, it just needs to be done. WannaCry was a Microsoft Windows ransomware, a software that locked the files by encrypting them. This particular ransomware was particularly nasty because it was network enabled, which allowed it to essentially spread like a virus throughout not only the local network, but the internet as well. What your organisation needs right now is a patch management solution in place to patch for known vulnerabilities as soon as they arise, so that no little malware buggers can infiltrate your systems.

Backup, backup again, and verify
Had your organisation been hit with the WannaCry malware and you’d had all of your data backed up, you’d have been laughing – for the most part. Regardless of encrypting malware potentially hitting you, backups are critical for all things disaster recovery and business continuity. Whether it be tape or cloud (like Cetus Continuum), all of your data needs to be replicated somewhere safe. Regardless of where you store it (and we really do suggest cloud), it should all be encrypted. Security is, after all of this, a priority.

Use all of the threat intelligence and prevention
If you haven’t heard, micro-segmentation is really in right now. Which is really great in the face of cyber security. Life may be like a box of chocolates, but your data centre needs to be more like a hotel and protect itself from east/west traffic. This next point is important; invest in some good threat intelligence and threat security. At the moment, we’re working with Check Point and VMware to highlight how merging Infinity and NSX can create the ideal security solution to protect you.

Figure out where you stand with a security posture review
There are hundreds of ways to fall foul of a cyber-attack in this day and age. With work no longer confined to the office, mobile workspaces have become all the rage – and for good reasons. Being able to work while on the field instead of having to wait to get back to the office, being able to work from home, or just simply being able to sort out an urgent matter when on holiday is revolutionary. And everyone’s trying to get into it. However, using some random Wi-Fi is always a risk. Honestly, you’ve not lived until you stand outside an O2 store trying to rob a second of Wi-Fi to send an email. In the rain. But how secure is that? A security posture review is essential to identify where your security has slipped. And it just so happens that we offer complimentary security posture reviews, where we analyse network traffic to detect a variety of security threats, evaluate end-point security, assess any threats that lurk in your infrastructure as well as other crucial little things. Have a chat with our experts to see where the danger can find a way in.

One thing is for definite; cyber security has never been so important, and making sure that your IT reflects that is the way to protect yourself as much as possible from an attack. It’s important to be proactive in your cyber security, or you’ll be reacting to a security breach instead.

Speak to an expert

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Check Point, Cloud, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Practice Safe Mobility – Protect Your Endpoints


No Comments

It’s not the naughties anymore – the age of consequence-free mobility is over I’m afraid. It’s time to start practicing safe mobility. It’s time to put some endpoint protection on your ‘device’. The result of not doing so exposes your business to risk from threats, data loss, and unauthorised access.

For decades now, endpoint security has been the domain of anti-virus software. This was because Windows endpoints were the primary target, and we all ‘knew’ that they were vulnerable. Many businesses installed AV software on endpoint and moved on to more important matters…

So, what’s changed? Well, I would suggest that things have changed from two perspectives: the ‘use case’ has changed, and the threat environment has changed.
Taking each in turn…

From a use case perspective:
• The age of the virtual desktop seemed to be upon us (at least from Cetus’ perspective) – and then came ‘the well-managed Windows 10 desktop’.

• We’ve been acting like consumers for years now – buying smart phones, tablets and phablets and then wanting to use them for work.

• We’ve also been liberating ‘our’ data – storing it in personal cloud stores like Dropbox and sending it via our personal email accounts in an effort to be more productive
So what’s changed from a threat perspective?

• The days of good ‘old-fashioned’ viruses seemed to disappear when the use of nation state cyber weapons ransomware became an everyday thing (think Wannacry).

• Threats are now specifically targeting mobile devices (think Man-in-the-Middle Attacks. Women-in-the-Middle attacks are also a threat).

• Public cloud services are now part of most corporate strategies (think OneDrive), extending network boundaries into ill-defined, global data centres.

• Increased legislation with regards to the protection of individuals and their personal data (think the GDPR and its somewhat over stated, but none the less terrifying €20m fine).

The above list is by no means exhaustive, and tries to give a flavour of the changing threat landscape. So where am I going with this? Well, the good news is that our friends at Check Point have a solution to your cyber woes. Our cyber security portfolio provides Check Point End Point Security and Security Gateway Appliances that allow us to provide end-to-end security that encompasses your data centre, end points and the Cloud.
Specifically, from an endpoint perspective – Check Point provides data security, network security, threat prevention and a remote access VPN for complete Windows, Mac OS X and mobile device security.

If you’ve been playing fast and loose with your endpoints then we’re here to help. Our free-of-charge Security Posture Review will provide you an opportunity to discuss your endpoint security challenges, as well as your wider cyber security posture with regards to perimeter, data centre and cloud components.

Speak to an expert

Directors-9619Paul Kiveal – Business Development Director
Paul works with business leaders, helping combine strategic objectives with innovative technical solutions, developing inspirational new IT platforms that transform the way technology powers organisations.