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Blog, Cloud, Cloud Hosting, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

How to Prevent Cloud Security Threats


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The end of winter is always a little grim, especially around the UK. The trees are bare, it gets dark way too early, the two-minute dash to the car threatens a soaking and the prospect of sitting outside with a cold beer/cocktail after a long day of work is surprisingly not tempting at all. I hate to be the harbinger of bad news, but it could get worse. Imagine coming in one morning, wind-swept and dripping, to the news that overnight your cloud was victim to a cyber-crime? At that point a cold beer in the snow seems like the best remedy for the situation. Despite everything, the internet isn’t as safe as you’d think, with devious no-gooders lurking around every corner, eager to take advantage of any vulnerability to make a quick buck. It’s especially important when your organisation is connected to the cloud, where your data is internet-facing instead of nicely locked up in an on-prem data centre. It doesn’t mean you should go out and raid Curry’s PC World for enough data storage to build a makeshift data closet though. Here are a few tips to keep your cloud secure, while enabling the innovation, data access and flexibility that you wanted in the first place.

We’re all in this together
The beauty of the network is that it’s all inter-linked. That’s how you can collaborate so easily, and throw your data and apps onto the cloud to access them whenever, wherever. Just remember, every ‘point of entry’ can be the weakest link, so it’s important to educate everyone in your organisation on how to protect themselves to protect the wider network community. It’s important to involve your entire organisation, making them aware that cyber security is just as much their responsibility as it is yours. Unfortunately, the biggest percentage of criminal infiltration comes down to users accidentally letting the cyber criminal in, usually through phishing or malware attempts. Phishing is a bigger threat to your organisation than ransomware is, and it all comes through malicious emails that get acted on. In this super quick blog post, I’ve already covered how to reduce the risk of getting on the phisherman’s hook. Also, it’s important to set up a (non-judgemental) plan for any user who feels that they might have been compromised, without them having to resort to throwing their laptop out of the window. Then you can be sure that they won’t be throwing out hardware willy-nilly, or sweeping incidents under the rug that could cause you harm in the long run.

Secure your data backup plan (just in case)
Data loss is a serious worry, always. Thankfully, in the case of cloud, this worry is slightly less. By storing your data in the cloud, it’s super simple to link your network to a backup storage solution to make sure that whatever happens you’ll be secure. We think that backups are so important that we’ve created a whole extra branch to Cetus; the Continuum Service. I’ve already touched on the 21st century’s answer to tape backup (it’s replication, by the way), and that’s what we offer with Continuum. It’s a full infrastructure recovery, and not just your data- making sure that your underlying server and desktop infrastructure is a-ok to get your business back on its feet in record time. It’s testing, on a regular basis, automatically verifying the integrity of each virtual backup server on its way to cloud, so that you know if something happens there’ll be minimal disruption. It’s a fully-managed service that allows your peace of mind knowing that we have a whole team on the situation, 24 hours a day. It’s a holistic backup and recovery solution that provides local file and VM restoration.

Who has access?
You can build the strongest walls around your building, adopt the most up-to-date firewall and screen every little thing that enters your network, but sometimes it’s important to be weary of the trojan horse plodding through your hallways every day. And by trojan horse, I mean an employee that could be stealing, irresponsibly sharing, or compromising your data. As an IT department, it’s important to assess who has access to what. There is absolutely no reason for Sharon in HR to be able to view or edit financial records, and what on earth could she be doing popping in twice a week at 3am? Establish access controls so that you can manage risk, tying user identities- even external ones- to back-end directories.

It’s important to put security measures in place that will ensure that your data and apps are protected. Why not embrace the latest technologies and adopt a smartphone access control system that will allow you to manage users and assign door access from anywhere?

Encryption and passwords are key
Your cloud can be quite vulnerable. Sitting up there, without the safety of your watchful eye, anything could be happening. It’s a bit like a spaceman floating in the big black expanse that is space, tethered to the International Space Station. He is protected by nothing more than his spacesuit, which shields him from the general elements, but there’s only so much you can do if he gets hit by a meteor. What he needs is an extra layer of bubble wrap and diamond outer shell. In the case of your cloud, this would look less rigidly cosy and more like good passwords and encryption.

In this example, we’re going to look at your spaceman’s bubble wrap; your password. Files in your cloud are zipped and protected with passwords, so it’s important that you choose a strong one. Having a unique password for your cloud is a must- if a hacker gains entry, they would have access to a huge amount of your data so it’s crucial that you keep it as safe as possible. Look into multi-factor authentication (which I’ve already discussed in detail in this post), adding an extra level of protection that you can control with fingerprint and retina biometrics.

If passwords are your spaceman’s bubble wrap, then encryption is his diamond shell, and it’s crucial. Cloud encryption allows your data and apps to be transformed by encryption, shooting up to the cloud securely before being stored. Encrypt at your network’s edge, ensuring that the data gets protected before it even leaves your network. But make sure to keep the encryption and deciphering keys stored away from where you store your data!

So, before you cobble together a makeshift data centre in a panic to protect your information, take a look at the level of security your cloud solution allows. The integrity of your cloud is vital for the health of your business; protecting your data and the access to it should be a priority for IT teams. Contact our Cetus experts to see how we can provide the ultimate protection for your cloud environment.

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

The New Hero of Cyber Security; Zero Trust


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The ability to work from anywhere, on any device, has quickly become one of the greatest developments in the workspace of all time. It’s not an exaggeration either. In the UK, 4.2 million people were working from home in 2015. In fact, between 2012 and 2016, the mobile workforce increased by 12.35%, and that percentage is growing exponentially year on year. It’s widely predicted that by 2020, half of the UK workforce will no longer be plonked in an office all day. That means that it’s time to invest in nice shoes and/or new pj bottoms. And while that’s an amazing turn of events, it will cause some significant security concerns for everyone concerned. With so much of your workforce wandering the plains of the UK, your network is no longer secure by actual brick and mortar perimeter.

Today’s increasingly decentralised enterprises have become a bit of a headache for IT, who now have to keep you secure even when you’re not potentially clicking on some dodgy email phishing links. Zero trust has evolved to answer the issue. Back when cybercrime was still all the way at Gen III, most organisations assumed that their security protection was robust enough to keep them safe. Those few who did err on the side of caution deployed security operations centres or other cyber monitoring solutions, but for the most part IT departments assumed that anything inside the perimeter was safe. Oh, but those were far simpler times.

By working on the assumption that any resource in the network might be compromised, zero trust puts monitoring solutions in place so that you have the power to take remedial action if it’s needed. With this new solution, no one service or server is considered more secure than the next. It’s basically a data-centric network design that puts micro-perimeters around specific data or assets, giving you the flexibility to apply more-granular rules can be enforced. It solves the ‘flat network’ problem of hackers infiltrating your network and scurrying around undetected. With the right guidance (you’re welcome in advance) and a little bit of know-how, it only takes a couple of steps to get started with zero trust.

Identifying your sensitive data is the obvious first step. It sounds like an easy way to start the process, but it’s a little more challenging than you’d think. You can’t possibly protect data that you can’t see or know about. You need to know where your employees store their data, exactly who uses it, how sensitive it is and how they, your partners and customers use it. Without knowing all of this, you’re putting your data and your organisation at risk. And you can’t exactly start investing in security controls until you know what it is you’re actually trying to protect. When you have a better idea of what you’re dealing with, it’s time to classify it all. I suggest procuring the help of your most organised member of staff before moving onto mapping your data.

To understand how you’re going to employ zero trust, and therefore micro-segmenting specific sensitive data, you need to know how it flows across your network as well as between users and resources. This is a fun (probably not) exercise to have with your stakeholders, such as application and network architects, to fully understand how they approach information. To give yourself a bit of a springboard, security teams should streamline their flow diagrams by leveraging existing models. A zero trust network is based on how transactions flow across a network, and how users and applications access data. Optimising the flow to make it simpler, and start identifying where micro-perimeters will be placed and segmented with physical or virtual appliances. In a network where the compute environment is physical, the segmentation gateway will usually be physical as well, whereas a virtualised compute environment will deploy a virtual segmentation gateway.

Micro-segmentation is the name of the game after you determine the optimum traffic flow, by determining how to enforce access control and inspection policies at the segmentation gateway. The point of zero trust is to enforce identity rights, so that you can control who has the privileges to access specific data, so it’s important to know exactly which users need to access what data. You need to know more than the source address, port and protocol for zero trust to work, since security teams need to understand the user identity as well as the application to establish access rights. Having created your ecosystem, it’s important to ‘Big Brother’ it to identify malicious activity and areas of improvement. There’s no point only logging traffic if it comes from the internet- god only knows what kind of infectious diseases your network could contract from a wild-spirited USB. With your shiny new zero trust network, the segmentation gateway can send all of the data flowing through it, which includes traffic destined for both internal and external network segments, straight to a security analytics tool that inspects it properly.

Now that you’re the proud owner of a zero trust network, you can rest easy knowing that your network is being monitored effectively. Here at Cetus, we believe that building the best architecture is just as important as keeping it safe. We’re experts in all things datacentre and cloud, so make sure to have a chat with one of our specialists who can help you through all of your security challenges. And while you’re at it, book yourself in for our complimentary security posture review to identify where your organisation is being exposed to the nasty things that lurk on the outside of your perimeter.

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Citrix, Cloud, Cloud Hosting, IT Solutions, Our Upcoming Events, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Five Signs You’re Ready to Embrace Cloud


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Unless you’ve been spending the best part of the last decade on a remote island devoid of human contact, chances are that you’ve heard a lot about this ‘cloud’ malarkey. And it’s a difficult one; there is just so much information out there, and it doesn’t always overlap. Even in your organisation, there can be significantly polar opinions on what’s best for your situation. In one ear, you have an IT specialist whispering “It’s the best thing since the Nokia 3310” and another one in your other ear muttering “It’ll take years to adopt, if we can even afford it”.

And both angel and devil in this scenario (decide which is which yourself) are right. Cloud is the best thing since the introduction of the Nokia 3310 redefined the use of the word ‘brick’, catapulting the world of on-the-go tech into a whole new revolution (even if that was just being able to play Snake at the bus stop). Sadly, we are constantly sold the idea of a plug-n-play service that will make a significant difference to your workforce. The thing is, it’s not the rainbows, unicorns and fluffy bunnies that we were promised. When it comes to cloud adoption, the focus is usually on going fully-SaaS almost overnight, which just isn’t really possible for long-established organisations. But it’s not all doom and gloom; if you pick the right IT solutions provider your dreams can become a reality, and deliver everything you expect. Still not sure if it’s for you? Here are five signs that you are ready to embrace cloud;

You’re adopting the new ‘mobile workforce’
Your business is growing and you’re employing more than ever. The millennial workforce has grown up with a significant experience in emerging tech, and they don’t know what life is like without it. The brightest graduates just out of uni are used to having their mobiles, tablets and laptops on the go. Let’s face it, they’re the generation that have mastered paying attention to multiple screens at once, all while walking, eating and doing whatever.

The problem is, they don’t want to be in an office all day. While the older generation are stuck in traffic three miles from the office, your mobile employees are already on their second coffee of the day, just finished replying to their emails and ready to get some real work done. Likewise, they’re more than happy to jump in the car, train or plane and join a conference, exhibition, workshop or a customer’s site and make sure they get all their work done on the spot. Gone are the days when your workforce would have to sacrifice a day to get the train to the other part of the country for an event, completely unavailable for anything else.

Work is no longer the be-all and end-all of a person’s life- living is. The modern workforce is picky. They no longer have the loyalty of generations before, sticking with one company until they retire. They want the best, and that includes the possibility of a more flexible work-life balance. So being able to work from anywhere, anytime makes far better sense. And that’s where the cloud comes in, allowing your employees to log in to their corporate virtual desktops from whatever device they happen to have on hand, regardless of where they are.

It’s time for a refresh
All tech, no matter how advanced it might seem, has it’s sell-by date. It’s a fact that a lot of organisations are quickly coming to realise. Chances are, this is the first time you’re looking at putting your servers in the cloud. Why not just replace your whole infrastructure like for like and be done with it? You’d forget how many bits of hardware makes up your IT closet, and how much of an investment it is just to keep the lights on in your data centre.

Now, it’s not as easy as clicking your fingers and just connecting everything to the cloud. There are plenty of reasons why it’s not feasible immediately; being chained to your legacy system, not having the internet connection to safely rely on cloud…. But don’t despair, there is a way to create an infrastructure so that it grows and evolves with your organisation and the latest trends in technology. Say goodbye to aging infrastructure, out-of-date applications and those constant reminders to get the latest version of your software. Poof! All of a sudden it’s a thing of the past.

It’s time to think about disaster recovery
Your organisation is built on a foundation of data. Whether that be customer lists, orders, customer data, the random PowerPoint presentation for the upcoming Directors’ meeting- you get the idea. If you couldn’t power up your laptop in the morning every employee in the company would essentially be a very expensive seat warmer. Disasters do happen, and if you can scoff that you haven’t experienced any yet, then you’re living on borrowed time. A single server fault could erase years of vital information in less than a second.

It’s even more scary when the facts state that the cost of an hour of downtime can cost from £6,100 to £534,000- and that includes small businesses too. Multiply that by the average time it takes to recover; 18 and a half hours. Could your business survive such a dramatic loss of productivity and reputation? 

By adopting the cloud and moving your data across, the majority of your disaster recovery planning is done. You can be safe knowing that your good solution provider will ensure that your data is being continuously backed up, testing the virtual backup server daily. When you do face your disaster, it’s reassuring to know that it’s simply a case of downloading the latest backups of your files and getting back down to business.

You’re growing, but you don’t know how to deal with it
Every organisation wants to expand. It’s the sign of success, of how a moment of entrepreneurship can turn into an achievement, and with every new person starting with you is an extra person who believes in your company and your message. But with every rapid expansion brings its own unique growing pains, and your organisation is no different. It’s only so easy to outgrow your physical infrastructure and network, leading to a loss of productivity. Which is exactly what you were trying to avoid in the first place, right?

Here’s another great way that cloud can make a difference. You obviously see a bright future for your organisation; full of targets being met, goals being blown right out of the water, the need for bigger offices, glittering awards nights and interviews from business newspapers on how you made it (may as well think as big as you can get, right?).

With your data, virtual servers and all of your storage in the cloud, it’s an easy fix to make your infrastructure flex with your needs. Instead of having to buy more servers and bandwidth, it’s a straightforward case of just renting a bit more of the cloud. And if you don’t need it later on, it’s quick and painless to reduce the size of what you need. As a certain meercat likes to say; “Seeemples!”

You want to beef up your data security
There are so many threats to your organisation. You always have to take care that your customer data collection and storage meets GDPR regulations, stay vigilant of potential Gen V cyberattacks, make sure that your ex-employee didn’t walk out with your company projects, there are plenty of things that could possibly go wrong. Not only do these really mess up your day, in only the politest of terms, but they could really cause you harm in the long run, too.

By running your organisation in the cloud, a significant portion of the manual processes that can lead to issues can be avoided. With automated backups, you can be sure that you’ll never have to run around patching up forgotten vulnerabilities and bugs. Having your data on the cloud makes it easier to see what your users are accessing, effectively abolishing the possibility of a user with a nefarious agenda sneaking around behind your back.

Every so often, you’ll change the door code to the office. That’s to secure your building from ex-employees who, let’s face it, have no business popping in anymore. It’s the same principle with your data. Chances are, you haven’t done anything to give them a reason to want revenge, but since they have no business rummaging around your secure files you want to make sure that they can’t. And that’s a simple thing to do with cloud, giving you the over-arching control over your users, without impeaching their self-governance.

Looking at a cloud adoption from afar can make the whole thing seem like an impossible task. When it comes to moving everything from on-premises to the cloud smoothly, while also keeping your business up and running with no disruptions, it’s akin to having your cake and eating it. At Cetus, we’ve been doing this for a while, and we’ve built a team of experts that has coordinated many a cloud project from start to finish. We’ve partnered up with Citrix and Microsoft Azure, the experts in cloud, to design, build and manage your cloud deployments. Speaking of Citrix, our Cetus experts will be attending the partner-only Summit event. We’re expecting to hear plenty about cloud migration and reducing IT costs, and we’ll be talking about it for the rest of the year so make sure to keep an eye out on our events page to hear all about our upcoming Citrix events! In the meantime, our experts are always on-hand to answer any question you might have (especially if it’s cloud-based!)

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Check Point, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Here Phishy, Phishy, Phishy….


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A couple of weeks ago, there was a mandatory ‘here’s how to help keep the company from falling prey to cyber attacks’ lecture at Cetus. We all trooped downstairs, cramming into one of our board rooms, mugs clinking and teas sloshing. One of the lovely ladies from Barclays came in to give us a word of warning- or forty- on how to spot nefarious activity and not fall prey to a scam. By the end of it we were all ready to delete our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts, never use an ATM, and I seriously started questioning my role within social media. It was quite the terrifying afternoon. Between social engineering, ransomware and phishing, it’s a miracle we all aren’t in debt from scammers. But the most terrifying aspect was learning just how prevalent phishing attacks are.

Big ransomware scams make the news constantly- splashed across the news, Sharon from HR standing at the water cooler to share the details in whispers to anyone who passes by- but phishing is the bigger threat here. In reality, a ransomware attack usually only demands several hundreds of pounds from the organisation it invades, while a phishing scam generally scams thousands of pounds from the victim. Not only that, but it’s easier for the cyber criminal to carry out a phishing attack. Now that I’ve given you something short of a heart attack (sorry), let’s turn this around shall we? Here are a few key ways of keeping you off the phisherman’s hook.

Beware of the sender
It doesn’t really matter whether it’s personal or corporate, receiving an email either makes you want to go on an extended holiday or celebrate. At work you’re usually too busy opening and replying in record time to get on with the mountain of tasks that grows with every email. It’s fair to say that you don’t always check who the sender is. I mean, we’re all weary of any Arabian Prince trying to get into contact, but aside from that we’re pretty chill for the most part. If they’ve gone to the trouble of finding your email address (I still can’t figure out how people manage to find me) then chances are they really need to chat, right?

Depending on how much of a nightmare you are in life, you probably won’t know the hacker. So before you jump into your emerging pile of unopened emails, take a quick look. If you suddenly get an email from someone you don’t speak to regularly on the topic of something that you don’t normally think about, be slightly weary. Check the sender’s address- does it look a bit weird? Is there a random ‘0’ instead of an ‘O’? Could that ‘i’ actually be Vietnamese character ‘ỉ’? Is there an extra letter or number in the address that shouldn’t be there? If you see one of these little tricks, bonus points for your great eyesight, and definitely get the email checked out.

‘I get scammed with a little help from my friends’
Did the email check out, but you’re still not 100% sure if you need to detonate your computer immediately to avoid any viruses escaping through the network? Take a quick look at the list of people that received the email. Do you know them? Is it a strange group, ie the sales group being added one name at a time instead of the group link? The cyber criminal might be targeting a large number of people in your organisation, so if you see people on the list that you wouldn’t normally be in contact with, or from a department that has nothing to do with yours, be extra careful.

Bit of a dodgy subject line
Aside from Sharon’s bi-monthly suggestion for drinks in the pub across the way after work on a Monday night, you should really only be getting emails that directly relate to your job function. That is, unless you’re in marketing- we seem to get our noses into plenty of unrelated jobs. If you’re getting emails about things that you know you’re not privy to or they make absolutely no sense to you, don’t open it. If it’s not spam, it’ll be malware. If you do happen to open it (oopsie), check if the email is a reply to one that you didn’t send. Does the message match the subject line? A misalignment of the two should send up an army of red flags. Also, while we all have the office oddball that likes to reply to emails at 3am, is it normal to be receiving this email from this sender at this particular hour?

Attachments and hyperlinks of doom
We’ve all opened random attachments or clicked on hyperlinks that we weren’t quite sure about and sighed with relief when it was just a video of cats acting strangely. We know we shouldn’t, but that curiosity can’t be helped. Besides, it could be important, or cats, after all. A few things to check before you right click; did you expect the attachment? Is it a common file type that you would normally receive? Does it have a weird name, or strange symbols in the file name? If you answer yes to these, maybe don’t open it. It’s quite likely to be malicious.

Not quite what you were expecting?
If you receive an email that contains unsettling, startling or urgent content that requires immediate action on your part, it’s most likely a phishing attack. There have been so many of these popping up recently, panicking the nation. At the moment, a common scam is an email from your bank claiming that your account has been hacked and you need to login straightaway, or even move the rest of your funds to another account. For the Netflix lovers among you, there have also been emails being received saying that billing information needs to be updated. Don’t fall for it. If the email includes a link to login or change account details, be extra weary. Don’t use links, web addresses or phone numbers.

Keeping yourself protected from any cyber crime can be a scary business, but even more so when it’s something you could very well unwillingly stumble into. It takes more than trusting your spam filter to keep yourself safe, having a strong cyber security solution is crucial. We work very closely with Check Point to craft solutions that stand tall against phishing, ransomware bots and all kind of nasties, using their SandBlast advanced endpoint threat prevention. Have a chat with our experts to see how we can whisk some cyber security into your perfect infrastructure solution so that it’s one less thing you need to worry about.

Speak to an expert

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Check Point, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Skyscraper: When Cyber Security Goes Wrong


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It was one of the biggest blockbusters of the summer. Dwayne Johnson’s Skyscraper thriller grossed $304.1 million during the hottest summer in living memory. Honestly, it probably would have made more, but for the fact that half of the UK population was sitting in any available patch of sun with a beer in their hands. I was one of those people, although with fruity cocktails instead. That was when I wasn’t in the office writing witty blog posts on Citrix Workspace, of course. Alas, while I had every intention on going to see the film, I never got around to it. So it was my pleasure, two Saturdays before Christmas, to snuggle in my pjs and pop it on (I lead the most exciting life when I’m not in the office). Well. While it’s action-packed with an interesting futuristic spin, I couldn’t help but spend the whole movie pointing out, sadly to no one in particular (I’m going to have to get a cat), all the various cyber security blunders that Johnson’s character made. Not one to waste my breath, or a good writing idea, I’m going to lay it all out in this blog post so that you can giggle along with me. Before we go any further though, there may be a spoiler or two, you have been warned.

In a nutshell, Johnson plays ex-FBI hostage-negotiator-turned-private-security-expert Will Sawyer, who gets called to Hong Kong in order to assess the security of the world’s tallest skyscraper. The Pearl, 225 stories and a whopping 1,100 metres tall, needs an inspection of the upper residential half before it can be opened to tenants. Since we are, after all, living through the ‘IOT for all of the things!’ revolution, no matter how mundane the appliance, it’s no surprise that the Pearl was built with tech in mind. It’s basically a giant computer, full of safety features and automations that make living and working there slightly more exciting than your average building. We saw absolutely zero evidence of it, but I’m still sure the lights turn on and off by clapping your hands. Anywho, we see Sawyer being given a tablet that controls the entirety of the 225 floors and shooed out of the door to go inspect the offsite security centre that controls the skyscraper. The tablet, obviously, isn’t in his possession for long, as it gets robbed by a group of terrorists who succeed in burning down the $200 billion structure with it. The sad part is, if the IT department had deployed a better cyber security solution, it could all have been avoided. Typical.

Who needs an effective authentication method, am I right?! This was mistake number one. For some incomprehensible reason, the only way of unlocking the tablet that controls the entirety of the building is via facial recognition. That’s it. Sure, in cinematographical terms this looks the best. It’s impressive and futuristic, suave and savvy. It’s every nerd’s dream. And facial recognition as part of multi-factor authentication is really effective. In the blink of an eye, it can analyse billions of tiny little markers on your face to unlock your device. But who on earth would think that it would be enough? For god’s sake, just signing into my Facebook requires my password, mother’s maiden name, list of my three favourite chocolate bars (in order) and the promise of my firstborn. Truth be told, facial recognition alone was irresponsible, and about as effective of protecting all that important data as using ‘1234567’ as a password. Hell, put a photo of Sawyer in front of the camera and that would probably fool it. There are so many effective ways to authenticate identity (I wrote an entire post on it). Why not have a secondary form of authentication, like having a password activate on Sawyer’s smartphone? That would have been clever.

Mistake number two; not informing the IT department of the breach. Err, this should have been the first point of call when Sawyer’s tablet got robbed. Instead, being the idiot that he is, he threw caution to the wind and went running off to save his family. Just one minute on the phone to IT and they could have stopped the disaster that was about to unfold. A good cyber security solution would have removed access to the tablet in a couple of clicks, rendering the terrorists’ efforts moot. In fact, it would have taken no time at all to wipe the data clean from the device, essentially turning it into an expensive, albeit sleek-looking, paperweight. It does echo a current issue facing organisations in terms of cyber security; the majority of security breaches come from employees who, inadvertently or not, allow the threat to infiltrate the network. This can happen from clicking on a dodgy link in an email (it’s sadly not a video of cats acting strangely)- in fact, phishing attacks are more prevalent and more likely to scam large sums of money from an organisation. Realistically, in this situation, Sawyer seriously neglected his responsibility to inform the IT department. While he undoubtedly performed some incredible gymnastics and it was thoroughly enjoyable to watch, I would have loved to hear his rationale when all was said and done. I doubt he’d be hired to assess the security of a paper bag after that!

The moral of this story is, and I’m sure it’s what director Rawson Marshall Thurber wanted to portray; don’t let your organisation become the Pearl and burn down to the ground- make sure your cyber security solution ticks all the boxes. We work closely with Check Point to incorporate secure technology into our solutions, effectively avoiding the risks that we saw Sawyer facing in the film, and many more besides. Have a chat with our cyber security solution experts here at Cetus, and in the meantime book yourself in for one of our complimentary security posture reviews!

Speak to an expert

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, Cloud, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Application Testing in the Cloud


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If you’ve been keeping up with the hype, you’ve probably been looking into deploying a cloud of some form in your organisation. Be it public, private or hybrid cloud, the possibilities that they come with are endless and revolutionary. I’m sure you’ve heard all of those buzzwords before, building the idea of ‘the cloud’ into an amazing, it’ll-fix-any-problem-you’ve-ever-had-and-more! miracle that’s more of a unicorn than anything else. But you might have discovered that it’s not all sunshine and rainbows when it comes to cloud. Application testing has become one of the little bugbears that people forget- or choose to ignore- when putting together a cloud strategy. When you roll out anything new, it’s important that it’s a success- your bottom line could very well depend on it. And without regular testing you don’t even know what you’re throwing out into the world.

Several years ago, virtualisation became a new focus for IT departments. This new ideology of sharing computing resources across multiple operating systems increased productivity through reduced costs and increased scalability and easy administration. This fabulous new way of running IT infrastructure observed the evolution of virtualisation of cloud in the form of cloud computing. It paved the way for the dream of ‘Everything as a Service’, essentially creating a foundation for many of the technological advances we have today (but for some reason I still can’t get a delivery from the McDonalds a mile away, so there are clearly more worldly advances yet to be achieved).

Cloud testing is the actual testing of the resources on demand; think hardware, software etc. Testing is crucial for the health of your IT environment, especially when it comes to your cloud offerings, ensuring that it not only meets functional requirements, but also non-functional. Securing and managing performance of your applications is essential regardless of where they are; in the cloud or on-premises. It’s not the case of testing an application when it first gets deployed and never needing to bother with it again; the status of applications can change over time.

There are so many benefits for cloud testing that are easily obvious when you experience them. The normal testing approach is to invest in the adequate hardware and software infrastructure needed to carry out the testing. Since the environment supplied to the testing team very rarely matches that of the user, testing applications in the cloud can alleviate the issue of rapidly-changing requirements, allowing the tester to easily replicate the user environment and find defects early in the cycle. Migrating apps to the cloud can also reduce the cost of infrastructure licence renewal, as the organisation doesn’t have to purchase the infrastructure that won’t all be in use at the same time. With the end user environment in the cloud, it’s a simple enough task for an IT department to customise the testing environment match. This customisation reduces the cost and time of regular testing. The testing team can easily perform load and performance testing scenarios in various permutations and combinations.

But, as with everything, there are downfalls. I hate to have to list them, but here we are. By relying on and using the cloud as infrastructure, we do face a few hiccups. But nothing too scary, I promise. Security is one; user privacy needs to be protected, while also allowing the necessary protections that hold up to standards. The security of applications that run in the cloud and security testing techniques also need to be addressed by organisations when it comes to cloud infrastructure. The performance of an application in the cloud is another significant issue that regularly gets overlooked. How are we to know if an application works the same way, especially when hosted in a private cloud? The application itself will be shared amongst plenty of users, so that could cause a delay, especially if bandwidth isn’t good enough for testing. It’s surprising that in certain instances, the particular configurations of a user can be that complex that they just simply aren’t supported by that cloud provider. I don’t get it either. Bottom line, that can make it that much more difficult to emulate a user environment. The last little issue is that of integration testing. It’s easy enough to test the network, database, servers, and whatever else needs to be done. The tester already won’t have control over the underlying environment, but on top of that they’ll have to essentially guess how it would behave. If there are interactions between two components, the tester can only anticipate risks, such as crashes, network breakdown, or your server going on a sudden holiday.

Ensuring the maintenance and performance of your applications in your chosen cloud is crucial for your organisation. Where a lot of people would just love to ignore the finicky bits of testing, here at Cetus we like to dot the Is and cross the Ts, and that includes your testing. Our experts are specialists in application testing and making sure that everything works just right. If testing of your applications is something you’d like to master, make sure to have a chat with one of our experts who will show you first-hand the benefits, while eliminating as many downfalls as possible.

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, IT Solutions, News, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

When 2019 Comes


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It was the mid-nineties, ‘IT’ was the new ‘data processing’, and we’d started using a new gadget called a ‘modem’ to connect our business to the outside world. They were exciting times; technology was changing how we communicated; and we could access technical information at any time. So … I decided that it was time to enlighten my team with a broad-thinking; almost visionary statement: “this Internet thing is really cool … but it’s just for techies”.

In hindsight; it ‘might’ be argued that my statement was, perhaps, a little bit short of ‘visionary’. In fairness; my comment was based on the, then, limited capabilities of CompuServe; which was nothing more than a chat group and download site for technical documents.

And so, with my ability to predict the future firmly and clearly established; it’s time for me to get to the topic of this blog: Top Predictions for 2019. As we, Cetus, look forward to the year ahead; we’re keenly aware that a number of technological drivers will affect the nature of our business. Here’s a few of the key drivers that we are gearing up for 2019:

1. The Internet. I’d better address this one – the Internet will continue to be quite popular in 2019. There, that’s that one put to bed.

2. Windows Desktops. Once the direct target of our VDI marketing efforts (due to its total cost of ownership and unpredictable user experience); the ability of Windows 10, in particular, to deliver a well-managed user environment has put Windows 10 back on the ascendancy.

3. Hybrid-Cloud. It’s been around for quite some time now, and many solutions providers are saying that it’s the future apparently. We beg to differ. Hybrid-Cloud is the ‘now’. You need look no further than Office 365 and SalesForce to see that we have been hybridising our clouds for quite some time now. 2019, however, will see the adoption of IaaS and PaaS, from the likes of Microsoft Azure and AWS, increasingly be the first choice of organisations across all sectors, public and private. 2019 will continue to favour solution providers who recognise that the resulting complexity is a feature not a failure of hybrid cloud; and who provide solutions that embrace and mitigate the complexity, rather than amplify it.

4. SD-WAN. Strongly related to the increasing adoption of the hybrid-cloud model; Software Defined WANs will see significant growth due to their ability to provide: increased resilience, lower price point and better performance over traditional WAN deployment methodologies.

5. Gen-V Security. Also referred to as Next Generation Security – the ability to deploy advanced threat protection that integrates boundary protection, endpoint protection and community threat intelligence is becoming a business necessity, rather than a nicety. Throw in Analytics and Micro-segmentation and you’ll soon realise that technology is providing a robust response to today’s multi-threat cyber security environment.

6. Virtual Workspaces. You might think that this is just the latest marketing term for VDI. We see it rather differently. Virtual Workspaces encompass more than just the desktop; we deliver a workspace that sees the desktop as merely a means to an end; namely a way of accessing applications and data. A Virtual Workspace now, more than ever, must be mindful of the desire of organisations and users to access their workspace using any device; from any location and at any time.

7. Automation. Our principle partners; Citrix, Microsoft and VMware all recognise that the increasing complexity of today’s IT environments require a more open approach to integration. This manifests itself as an increasing focus on cross IT element automation; relieving the IT function of large swathes of BAU activities, allowing them to focus on business innovation.

The above are all encapsulated by our 2019 Solutions Portfolio. By working closely with our primary vendor partners; we are able to draw down their strategic visions, and to combine these with over 17 years of delivering Secure Application and Data Delivery Platform solutions. The result is that we now have hundreds of customers who count on us to help guide them through turbulent times; who see us an extension of their IT teams; and with whom we have the genuine pleasure of travelling into 2019 as partners.

To hear more about how we can help your organisation get ready for the challenges of 2019; why not keep an eye out on our events page to hear all about our upcoming Citrix events?

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Directors-9619Paul Kiveal – Business Development Director
Paul works with business leaders, helping combine strategic objectives with innovative technical solutions, developing inspirational new IT platforms that transform the way technology powers organisations.

Blog, Check Point, Cloud, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

The Cyber Security Threats You Need to Plan for in 2019


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It’s that time of year again; time to be weary of scary things jumping out on your screen when you’re least expecting it, of monsters following you into your dreams and escaping from your [data] closet. I’m referring, of course, to National Cyber Security Month, the month to take extra care when it comes to protecting your organisation from cyber-gremlins. And I’m sure you’ve been hearing about it non-stop for the last three weeks; participating in the office games, including ‘bobbing for malware’, ‘pin the data on the phishing attempt’ and ‘pass the ransomware’. All party classics. Regardless, it’s an important issue that gets pushed to the side all too often throughout the year. So now is the time to make that extra bit of effort to make sure that you’re protected should the Big Bad Cyber-attack knock on your door (or make you realise just how badly your straw house was lacking).

To switch things up a bit, I thought it would be clever to start thinking about what lies ahead, when the dark, cold nights and endless Christmas parties make way for snow in April. Now is a good time to start planning for 2019, and what the cyber landscape might look like next year. I’ve dusted off my crystal ball and called upon the spirit of Google to tell me exactly what cyber security threats we’re most likely to hear about next year. So buckle up, take notes, and be prepared to impress your boss with your savvy goal-setting ambitions. You’re welcome in advance.

It seems like the world spent the entirety of 2018 running around trying to put out phishing fires. Unless you live under a rock, or are lucky enough to spend your days on a wifi-less beach, you can’t have missed the crazy number of phishing attacks that were publicised. Every second cyber security article had details of attacks and startling statistics (76% of businesses reported being a victim of an attack in 2018 so far). Alas, while phishing has been around since 1980, it has just been ramping up in popularity and severity over the last year or so. When it comes to internal threats, it’s by far the easiest way to get access to sensitive information. According to a Verizon report, 30% of phishing attacks get opened by American users, with 12% of those targeted by the emails clicking on the infected links or attachments. The element of human error makes it that much more appealing. Unfortunately, the only solution to phishing (for the time being anyway) is to train your users to be extra vigilant when opening emails from external sources, and make sure your spam filters are extra strong.

Here’s an interesting (albeit worrying) one; your new smartphone being compromised before it even gets in your hands. Malware is another one of those evil little buggers that can really cause trouble if you’re not very careful. Like phishing, it’s becoming a prevalent part of the internet landscape that users have to be wary about, kind of like not playing in traffic and eating your vegetables. In a society where being always-on is a necessity, mobile phones have become replacements for desktop computers. Think about it, what do you store or have access to on your laptop that you don’t on your phone? The data your phone collects on a daily basis is a very attractive target for cybercriminals. But the modern cybercriminal doesn’t have to stand on a street corner and ‘accidentally’ bump against you to steal your mobile, and ergo your data. Apps are an easy hands-free way to bypass security measures and cause trouble without even clicking on a malicious link. There have even been reports of smartphones leaving the factory floor with malware built in! This malware, called Cosiloon, can send users to download dodgy apps that they didn’t intend on accessing. The app is passive, only visible to the user in the settings section, but then connects with a website to grab the payloads that hackers want to install on the phone.

Speaking of phones, surprise, surprise; cryptocurrency is going to continue to be a massive deal in 2019. And since it is, the dollar signs in the eyes of hackers are getting even bigger. Cryptomining was a new trend for 2018, but without a doubt will gain traction during the next year. Uber-clever cybercriminals infect machines to commandeer their CPU power and steal Bitcoin. What we will most likely see in 2019 is the rise of cryptomining through mobile devices. Since cybercriminals need the infected device to be running to access the processing power, it only makes sense for them to move onto always-on mobile devices. Clever, huh? Many hackers simply create useful and legitimate apps, such as calculators, music videos or voice recording technology, and then embed a script that allows the cryptomining plugin to work silently in the background (don’t start getting any ideas). Since the nature of mobile is to simply make everything so damn complicated and finicky, you probably wouldn’t even notice the extra tab on your browser. The only thing that would indicate that you were a potential victim would be the quick-draining battery. But let’s face it, how often would you attribute awful battery life to a hacker, rather than just having an older phone? “You’d need terrible mobile security!” you might guffaw, pitying the idiot commoner that wouldn’t think of protecting their mobile devices (oops, that would be me). Alas, cryptomining doesn’t technically compromise the security of the device, as it doesn’t bypass security systems or install any rogue software. If you think you’re being clever by installing app-only or endpoint-based security solutions, you won’t be the one laughing (I don’t feel so bad then).

CheckPoint’s SandBlast Mobile is one fabulous piece of software that can and will protect your mobile devices. It protects users from threats to the OS, apps and network, and boasts the industry’s highest threat catch rate. Zero-day malware, using a software vulnerability for which there isn’t any available fix or defence at the moment, is being created and released onto unsuspecting victims every day. SandBlast Mobile blocks zero-day malware (I think it’s magic, actually), and prevents phishing on your apps. If you’re worried about infected devices accessing corporate data, it will intuitively block the device, while also blocking infected devices from sending on sensitive data to botnets. Possibly the most innovative feature of SandBlast Mobile is how it mitigates threats without having to rely on a management platform, which means that you’re protected even when you might not be on the ball (mobile attacks can also happen after late nights- you can’t have Spidey senses all the time!). Regardless of what you do or access on your mobile, if you work from your phone- even if it’s just to reply to emails- SandBlast Mobile is the all-encompassing solution for you. Well then, we can pretty much strike off two of those potential 2019 issues with just one technology!

We’re all for embracing the future here at Cetus. There is so much to look forward to, and so many awesome new technologies- both malicious and not- that will come about, regardless of how well you try to prepare. Working with CheckPoint, we feel reassured that our cyber security is covered, regardless of time, place or device. If you’re interested in what our experts have to say about all the cool things that CheckPoint offer, you can have a chat with them with here. And don’t forget to tell us what you think; what will 2019 have to offer by way of cyber security threats?

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, IT Solutions, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Improving your Network Security; it Doesn’t Have to be a Scary Business


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It’s finally October! Time for the quintessential Pumpkin Spice Latté from Starbucks, complaining about the sudden early evenings and frantic last-minute costume shopping for the office Halloween party. It also happens to be International Cyber Security Month; a friendly reminder to take extra care when it comes to your cyber security, lest a cyber-Dracula should invade and exsanguinate you of all of your rich, iron-filled data. Here at Cetus, we’re always up for a bit of spooky fun, but when it comes to security we’re serious. This week, in honour of Anti-Malware,-Ransomware,-Phishing,-And-All-Things-Evil Month (it’s original title wasn’t quite catchy enough), I’m going to try and make improving your network security a little bit more fun. I’m only 125 words in, so there can be no promises.

Along with an effective cyber security policy, creating a plan in the case of a cyber-attack, using micro-segmentation to minimise the damage of said cyber-attack, making sure that you have ample backups in place to maintain your business after a cyber-attack, and many, many more stress-inducing topics for you to worry about, making sure your network security is up to scratch is also crucial for your business. (If you’re looking at that list and wondering what on earth you’ve been missing, they all link to delightfully hilarious posts that will alleviate all of your fears.) Your network is the glue that holds the entirety of your organisation together. Or, in this instance, it’s the stitching that holds the body parts of your Frankenstein Monster of an organisation in place. Ever try sharing a digital document with Stacy from HR in the next building without a network? It would be faster to train a carrier pigeon to knock on her window- but that wouldn’t be without the risk of interception. Or practise morse code- unless Stacy is on the other side of the building. If you’re lucky enough to be by a window directly across from her, there’s always the option of folding up a paper airplane or, my favourite, using a tin can telephone. And those are all well and good, but what about if Stacy’s office is in another country- or continent? An ultra-sophisticated, time-locked carrier pigeon is the only way to go. Unless you have a secure network, that is.

But ‘pub tonight?’ emails aren’t the only things your network adds to your business (though it might be one of the most important ones). Think of all of the many files that are stored on your organisation’s shared network drive, and all of the instances you need to access one. Last-minute edits to the document that your sleepy, unsupervised intern prepared for your board meeting? Holiday request form? I guarantee you, you pop in there at least once a day to spend half an hour looking for a document someone else created. Without your network, you’d be a building of USBs wandering around the office. Your extremely helpful Outlook calendar that allows you to own the time of your colleagues (but also allows them to rule over yours) is thanks to your secure network, too. Want to work in a café/building site/park bench (near a Wi-Fi source; it’s not that magical)/car park? Feel free to use whatever open Wi-Fi network you want without the worry of a cyber-creep stealing all of your organisation’s secrets. And a lack of network security cost UK small businesses a collective, but nevertheless horrific, £11bn in 2016. So, how do you take care of your Frankenstein Monster?

If your network is Frankenstein Monster’s stitching, then a healthy network security policy is the age-defying, pollution-barrier moisturiser that keeps everything supple. A clear, simple and comprehensive network policy makes everything work smoothly. All it takes is a written document that outlines user policies; who is allowed to access the network, what privileges and limitations do they have, etc. There’s no point letting just anyone who happens to be working for the organisation into every file; unless you’re sending her paper airplanes, Stacy from HR shouldn’t be included in the notes of the main board meeting. A good risk assessment test, identifying important data sets and creating a disaster recovery plan is all that is needed to make sure your network security policy is ready to go! It’s also a good idea to organise drills within your IT department to make sure that the new implementations have been well received by your users, and to identify if they need further training.

A lot of organisations do well to make sure that their network is safe, by investing in the most expensive, most sophisticated and most snazzy infrastructure to keep the outside out. However, where they fail is usually keeping the ‘snazzy’ up to date. We already know that loopholes from unpatched networks can cause some serious security breaches (WannaCry, anyone?), so it’s crucial that your IT department acts on whatever updates may come about. If, for example, Frankenstein’s Monster were to lose a finger or nose, you wouldn’t leave it be, right? So, patch, patch, patch. Speaking of, bad passwords are like skin erosion. Let that fester and it won’t take long until the bad outside germs (cyber threats, in this example) pierce through and infect the entire body. In the age of Gen-V cyber-attacks, it’s important that your password policy is up to the security demands of your organisation. Maybe think about multi-factor authentication? I’ve already written loads on that, but to make it brief, think about making passwords expire every 60 to 90 days, just to be safe.

It’s time to don your favourite lab coat and get into your Dr Frankenstein head space, because now we’re talking about auditing and mapping. Place your monster on the slab and open him up! Know everything about your entire network’s infrastructure; what servers, printers, computers, devices and users are connected? How to they connect, and how do they maintain their connectivity throughout the network? Look for vulnerabilities that could end up causing you trouble in the long run. Keep an eye out for ways you could improve security, performance and reliability. Basically, see if you can replace a few weakened patches of skin with some robust tin and give it a zap to bring it to life.

Last but not least, Dr Frankenstein would hardly have created his monster without making sure he had plenty of backup arms and legs, just in case. And neither should you. Chances are, a hacker will find their way into your system. Which sounds a whole lot less scary if you’ve already read all about micro-segmentation and you’re compartmentalising your network. Regardless, it would be best to make sure you’ll never be caught out if it were to happen. As always, we’ve got you sorted, since we always take backup seriously.

IT’S ALIVE! Now that we have all of that sorted (that wasn’t as torturous as you’d thought, was it?), we’d love to hear what you think. Is Frankenstein’s Monster the best monster comparison of your network? Have you suddenly realised that maybe you need to take another quick look into your security? Have a Halloweeny chat with our experts to see what we can do for you, and decide what you’re going to dress up as this year.

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Speaking of, I’ve finally decided on my costume for the office party; Cyber-Dracula. Sorted.

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, GDPR, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

Is The Password Dead?


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My boyfriend was amazing me last weekend when he showed me how he could unlock his brand-new Google Pixel 2 using just his voice. I was seriously impressed until he laughed and showed me the index scanner on the back that actually unlocked it. To be honest, it’s a perfectly useless piece of hardware since I know his pin code anyway. Which isn’t much of a win- I just get full access to the albums upon albums of stupid memes that he stores for later consumption.

These days, it seems as though you’d need to live and work in the Pentagon to keep your data safe. And even then, you’d probably be safer by having a photographic memory and never writing or typing anything. Ever. For the entirety of your life- and chances are, you’ve ballsed that one up already, right? If not, there you go, cyber security problem solved. You can tell that annoying antivirus update pop-up reminder where to stick it because you JUST DON’T NEED IT. However, if you don’t have the privilege of a) living in the Pentagon or b) having a photographic memory, then keeping your data safe can be a smidge harder (and I’m betting that’s most of us). Back in the old days of computers and the internet, simple passwords were enough to keep sensitive data safe. Nowadays, the opportunities for cyber criminals to exploit this information are too good for these less-than-moral people to miss out on.

But, as with the Google Pixel 2, we’re quickly catching on to the fact that a simple password or pin number isn’t enough, especially when it comes to our accounts online. According to password management company Dashlane, a single email address can be registered to a whopping 130 passwords. This tells us that some people either have too much time on their hands or a terrible memory, or both. Let’s be honest, when we have a password that we can remember, has a capital letter, a special character AND contains more than eight letters, we all use the same one for the random things around the web. Deliveroo, Amazon, Tesco Delivery; so many things are online now and they all require an account. And it’s not much better in the workplace. ‘For security purposes’, passwords get changed every three months or so at work, but it’s just a case of using a particular word and going up the number line each time we get that annoying notification. I am definitely guilty of this (I wait until the absolute last minute to message around to all of our IT support techies to get it changed. So they all end up knowing my new password. I like to call it ‘herd immunity’). And 42% of workers admit to sharing their passwords with co-workers. So, in the age of GRPR and a heightened awareness of cybercrime, we have to ask ourselves; is the password dead?

A recent Verizon report states that two thirds of data breaches are caused by stolen passwords or misused credentials. So basically human error. And it’s not like we can remove that problem until AI progresses enough to create robots that can do the work for us- wouldn’t that be convenient? Maybe robots are the answer, but not in the short term.

Passwords are a lot like mayonnaise. You wouldn’t consume it on its own (or at least not more than a tablespoonful or two straight from the jar at a time), but it’s a nice little addition to a dish. So what would be the ‘piece de resistance’? We have biometrics that are starting to become popular. Even I managed to fall into the ‘high tech’ phenomenon of having a thumb scanner on my ancient iPhone. And how many times has NatWest bothered me about getting their banking app? “It’s so much safer!” they say. “I don’t trust mobile devices!” I scream back. “WE’VE NEVER HAD A SECURITY BREACH!” they holler. “I WILL NOT BELIEVE IT!” I finish. I’m paraphrasing, of course, the conversation I had with my, considerably older, banking agent. Shocked that a twenty-something would have so little faith in technology, he took out his fancy phone to show me. Needless to say, I won that argument. As it was, it took me a while to get into the idea of biometrics. Realistically, all it takes is some criminal genius to sever your finger to access your bank account. I don’t know about you, but having someone steal my money after stealing my thumb is, quite literally, adding insult to injury.

So what about removing the password altogether? I’m not suggesting we scrap the whole thing, of course. But multi-factor authentication has become something of interest recently. Microsoft shocked the world in May when they announced in a blog post that they were trying to rid the world of passwords for good. Promising a future where end users will never have to deal with passwords while also vowing that user credentials will never be ‘cracked, breached or phished’ seems too good to be true. But apparently, with 47 million users worldwide, Windows Hello is very much a thing. And it only needs one authentication method; facial recognition (luckily, you’re slightly less likely of having your face severed), fingerprint or retina scan. If you are absolutely adamant that fingerprint scan is the way you want to go, you can buy a tiny little USB device to plug into your laptop, a bit like the connection bit of a wireless keyboard. I’ve said it before, but starting my day like Tom Cruise in Minority Report sounds pretty cool. I might just start getting out of bed at the first alarm every morning. My ultimate favourite feature of Windows Hello is Dynamic Lock. It’s a fancy name for something pretty simple; essentially, your computer detects when you’re out of reach and automatically locks itself. And by ‘you’, I mean your phone. So you’ll never have to worry about fire drills, emergency pee breaks, or having your laptop stolen out of the window by sleuths with fishing rods. True peace of mind.

What makes Windows Hello so secure? If you use facial or fingerprint recognition, Microsoft does not transfer the raw data over the internet. So that’s already a huge chunk of potential Mission Impossible criminals who won’t be able to make latex copies to break in. Apparently, Microsoft doesn’t even store the raw data, creating a digital abstraction instead that can only be interpreted with a machine. And what user information does get transferred across the internet gets encrypted to almost-Pentagon standards. And all you need is the Windows 10 Anniversary Update- easy!

So, what do you think? Will you be chucking that little black notebook full of usernames and passwords? (Maybe burn it instead) Or will you insist on keeping the same password you’ve used since you had to put your social media profiles on private? Either way, you might be interested in hearing what our experts can do for you.

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.