Virtualisation

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Navigate Hybrid Cloud Complexity With VMware NSX


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Chances are, if you’ve been thinking about cloud, or you’ve started on your cloud journey, you’ve heard about hybrid cloud. It’s becoming the future of not only the IT departments that run the organisations, but the very culture and fabric of the organisation itself. Employees can no longer afford to be sitting in an office all day; the very definition of a lot of roles requires the flexibility and fluidity of working remotely. With that, organisations are having to modify and modernise along with this new wave of thinking. IT has had to move away from centralised data centres to a model where applications and data are mobile and easily distributed. In the race to stay relevant and dynamic, many organisations have taken the leap from managing a single data centre to adopting cloud- which usually involves more than one. But the trick with all of this digital transformation is meeting the needs of users without jeopardising security. Having so many clouds can be tricky. We’ve already discussed the issue of cloud sprawl storing data all over the place, which makes it somewhat of a challenge to identify it all and ensure that it remains secure.

Cloud promises so much. Remote working, secure storage, content collaboration, scalability, flexibility…. Plenty of yummy buzzwords that organisations want to achieve. Though, they have quickly realised that it’s not as easy as it looks, especially when it comes to incorporating and managing multiple clouds. And it’s not that they’re foolish or unprepared; deploying cloud can be a significant nightmare, full of terrors and bumps in the road, and sometimes it’s just not possible to foresee the need for something until you’re too far gone. In the haste to join the Cool Cloud group (who wouldn’t, there are badges), many organisations just didn’t have the time to address the divergent expectations and demands on IT and the business, leading to misalignment and a lot of frustration.

VMware solves the issue of the multi-cloud with their NSX solution. VMware has been a leader in the IT industry for decades, and is known for providing the modern network virtualisation solution that aligns business and IT around the same objectives, which is pretty important when IT is what drives your business. It’s comprised of several solutions that work together to create a well-rounded solution. NSX Data Centre reproduces your entire network model in software, making it easy for you to create and provision any network topology in seconds, whether they’re simple or complex multi-tier networks. It creates a common operating environment for all of your applications, either on-premises or off. A streamlined workflow is enabled by automation, meaning that you’ll be able to get more work done faster, with security that’s built-in and tied to your apps and data. NSX Cloud provides consistent networking and security for applications that run natively in public clouds, while delivering enterprise-class capabilities- just like micro-segmentation, to enable easy control over your east-west traffic. It results in precise control over your cloud networking and increases network visibility and analytics. NXS Hybrid Connect delivers secure, seamless application mobility and infrastructure hybridity on-premises and in the cloud. This provides high-performance, highly secure and optimised multi-site interconnects.

That all sounds fab, but what does it actually mean for you? What VMware NSX delivers is a unified platform, which is exactly what you want when you’re dealing with complex cloud environments. Since it’s a common operating environment, it provides a single point of control to break down silos and give you more freedom. It delivers high operational efficiency, eliminating manual network configuration and reconfiguration with its super smooth automation, which allows you to quickly grow or shrink applications across environments. With high workload mobility, NSX enables a fast, low-touch migration process that allows you to realise secure, seamless app mobility across all of your sites and clouds. And finally, with NSX technology, you can easily improve standardisation, by provisioning and managing networks and security services within a single management interface, for consistency and scale across all of your environments.

VMware is a leader in virtualisation, that buzzword you’ve been hearing about a lot but figured you’d look into it at another time. It has been a leader in enabling organisations to navigate multi-cloud complexity in this digital era. With the cloud freedom that it delivers, your IT and your organisation can become partners in innovating across clouds, without adding to cost and complexity. Here at Cetus, we love VMware, and we think that NSX is the bees knees (last year we earned VMware’s specialist competency in Network Virtualisation for our experience and expertise in delivering NSX)  If you want a bit of cloud freedom for yourself, make sure to have a chat with our experts, who love a good multi-cloud challenge.

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, IT Solutions, Technology, Uncategorized

Take Control of Your Data Centre With Hyper-Converged Infrastructure


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It’s really hard to be part of an IT department these days. Having become the very lifeblood of an organisation, the loss of a work-reliant component of any kind can cause a revolt, scenes from the Apocalypse or even mass mutiny. Whether it’s a device, the network, internet access or email, the failure of just a single one can make your organisation grind to a halt. Let’s face it, no one wants to press something in the effort of fixing an existing issue just to get inundated in phone calls by grumpy users who can’t access anything. I’m sure that there are IT managers up and down the country nodding along, absentmindedly caressing their internal scars from the first ring of the phone and getting hit by flashbacks of an incident that frankly only an IT member can understand.

Finally, some IT genius somewhere in the world wanted to minimise the complexities and frustrations for the rest of the tech community by creating a system so simple, so easy to manage and so flexible that it would make sliced bread look like a stupid innovation. This amazing creation is called hyper-converged infrastructure and IT departments the world over are bowing down to whichever person designed it. HCI promises operational efficiency, reduced costs and manageable scaling that combines all of a data centre’s necessary components (think of your storage, networking backup and everything else) into a pre-packaged unit that can be controlled and managed by a single console. Frankly, I’d say the only reason that we don’t have a national holiday devoted to this mind-blowing achievement is the fact that cloud computing blew in, screaming for attention, and took over the hype. So, I thought it would only be fair to give HCI some of the spotlight and cheerleaders, by giving it the attention it deserves and listing its many benefits so you become Team HCI too.

Buy more to reduce cost
Obviously, anything that reduces cost becomes automatically more interesting to those who make the big decisions and have the Financial Department around their little fingers. When it comes to IT, the organisations that want to invest in any new hard- or software generally pump money into the sleekest, fastest and newest toy that’s on the market. In terms of HCI, you’ll be delighted to discover that the cost of entry of this whole new system is actually lower than you’d expect. That’s because hyper-convergence uses an economic model similar to that of public cloud providers, by using low-cost commodity hardware and scaling the data centre little by little. With this ‘Lego’ building-block approach, your IT can expand as and when you need it to.

Simplify your operations
A day in the life of your IT team involves a lot of admin and everyday tasks. Add in the complexity created by so much tech, and your IT department can quickly become overwhelmed by the little bits, rather than focusing their energy on the projects that really need their attention. Since hyper-converged infrastructure systems consolidate core storage, backup, deduplication and networking, goes without saying that hardware clutter and touchpoints get drastically reduced. All workloads fall under the same umbrella which makes it easier to migrate VMs between different appliances or data centres. With all of that previously pesky everyday admin duties taken care of, the IT department can either get smaller, or redistribute their focus into something more important. Legacy data centre hardware gets folded into HCI, which means that there’s no need to have several specialists in each resource area running around the office- IT staff only need a broad knowledge to apply infrastructure resources to meet individual application needs.

Make automation work for you
Legacy infrastructure has proven to be quite a hindrance in the face of the latest waves of tech modernisation. Because they can be so varied and complex, automation has been impossible to adopt. As hyper-converged infrastructure works on the principle of a software-defined data centre, automation of routine operations can be achieved with centralised management tools implemented. Everything is included in a unified environment, taking the headache of implementing hardware from various manufacturers or product lines. Adapting automation increases efficiency of the IT team, keeping the business as a whole agile and competitive.

Data protection
Organisations are looking for the Holy Trinity when it comes to their IT infrastructure; the ability to work remotely, having the most agile and up-to-date infrastructure, and keeping everything safe. With an organisation’s network no longer confined to the four brick walls of the building, protecting data, applications and workspaces from the evil lurking beyond the perimeter has become even more important, especially in the wake of Gen-V cyber attacks such as WannaCry. Hyper-converged infrastructure is a leader in cloud efficiency and storage, incorporating snapshotting, data deduplication and other data protection features which is exactly what you want in your corner when disaster strikes and you need to recover everything. It offers higher resiliency than traditional legacy systems, with the scale-out model relying on data being spread across multiple nodes throughout a single, or between several, data centres. If one appliance or rack goes down, you won’t have to worry about performance or availability suffering.

Feel the freedom of flexibility and scalability
Another step away from the archaic confines of a legacy system, HCI allows for greater flexibility for your data centre. Since it’s based in software, it takes a ‘Lego block’ approach to scalability, with each HCI appliance a self-contained unit that includes all of the hardware resource your data centre needs. This allows increased compatibility, and a quick expansion of data centre capacity by simply adding on an extra unit or two when needed. There’s no need for complex update plans each time you need to expand, nor do you need to plan years in the future by estimating what compute resource you might need and investing in costly data centres all in one go, just for it all to be old and out of date by the time you need it.

Simplified procurement and support
Since HCI is basically a plug-and-play unit that incorporates pretty much everything you would need in your data centre, it’s quite similar to the offerings of systems integrators. By getting one point of contact for the life of the system, your IT team can cut out a lot of unnecessary faffing about between different vendors and hardware models. This makes it more cost-effective than integrated systems, especially when it comes to upgrades. When the manufacturer makes any upgrades, the units gain the benefits automatically, without having to replace hardware.

At Cetus, we have a long-standing relationships with leading HCI vendors. Have a chat with one of our experts, and experience the benefits of HCI first-hand.

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cetus Solutions, IT Solutions, News, Security, Technology, Uncategorized

When 2019 Comes


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It was the mid-nineties, ‘IT’ was the new ‘data processing’, and we’d started using a new gadget called a ‘modem’ to connect our business to the outside world. They were exciting times; technology was changing how we communicated; and we could access technical information at any time. So … I decided that it was time to enlighten my team with a broad-thinking; almost visionary statement: “this Internet thing is really cool … but it’s just for techies”.

In hindsight; it ‘might’ be argued that my statement was, perhaps, a little bit short of ‘visionary’. In fairness; my comment was based on the, then, limited capabilities of CompuServe; which was nothing more than a chat group and download site for technical documents.

And so, with my ability to predict the future firmly and clearly established; it’s time for me to get to the topic of this blog: Top Predictions for 2019. As we, Cetus, look forward to the year ahead; we’re keenly aware that a number of technological drivers will affect the nature of our business. Here’s a few of the key drivers that we are gearing up for 2019:

1. The Internet. I’d better address this one – the Internet will continue to be quite popular in 2019. There, that’s that one put to bed.

2. Windows Desktops. Once the direct target of our VDI marketing efforts (due to its total cost of ownership and unpredictable user experience); the ability of Windows 10, in particular, to deliver a well-managed user environment has put Windows 10 back on the ascendancy.

3. Hybrid-Cloud. It’s been around for quite some time now, and many solutions providers are saying that it’s the future apparently. We beg to differ. Hybrid-Cloud is the ‘now’. You need look no further than Office 365 and SalesForce to see that we have been hybridising our clouds for quite some time now. 2019, however, will see the adoption of IaaS and PaaS, from the likes of Microsoft Azure and AWS, increasingly be the first choice of organisations across all sectors, public and private. 2019 will continue to favour solution providers who recognise that the resulting complexity is a feature not a failure of hybrid cloud; and who provide solutions that embrace and mitigate the complexity, rather than amplify it.

4. SD-WAN. Strongly related to the increasing adoption of the hybrid-cloud model; Software Defined WANs will see significant growth due to their ability to provide: increased resilience, lower price point and better performance over traditional WAN deployment methodologies.

5. Gen-V Security. Also referred to as Next Generation Security – the ability to deploy advanced threat protection that integrates boundary protection, endpoint protection and community threat intelligence is becoming a business necessity, rather than a nicety. Throw in Analytics and Micro-segmentation and you’ll soon realise that technology is providing a robust response to today’s multi-threat cyber security environment.

6. Virtual Workspaces. You might think that this is just the latest marketing term for VDI. We see it rather differently. Virtual Workspaces encompass more than just the desktop; we deliver a workspace that sees the desktop as merely a means to an end; namely a way of accessing applications and data. A Virtual Workspace now, more than ever, must be mindful of the desire of organisations and users to access their workspace using any device; from any location and at any time.

7. Automation. Our principle partners; Citrix, Microsoft and VMware all recognise that the increasing complexity of today’s IT environments require a more open approach to integration. This manifests itself as an increasing focus on cross IT element automation; relieving the IT function of large swathes of BAU activities, allowing them to focus on business innovation.

The above are all encapsulated by our 2019 Solutions Portfolio. By working closely with our primary vendor partners; we are able to draw down their strategic visions, and to combine these with over 17 years of delivering Secure Application and Data Delivery Platform solutions. The result is that we now have hundreds of customers who count on us to help guide them through turbulent times; who see us an extension of their IT teams; and with whom we have the genuine pleasure of travelling into 2019 as partners.

To hear more about how we can help your organisation get ready for the challenges of 2019; why not keep an eye out on our events page to hear all about our upcoming Citrix events?

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Blog, Cetus Solutions, Cloud, Cloud Hosting, Technology, Uncategorized

Why Cloud Needs SD-WAN


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What a wonderful day it is when I get to write about two of my favourite things; cloud and SD-WAN. Both have been making quite a splash in the world of IT since their conception, but it’s only recently that they’ve been put together to create an easier transition to cloud.

Software-defined (that’s the SD part) wide area network (aaaand that’s the WAN part) is a particular application of software-defined networking (SDN- this is going to get complicated) technology that’s applied to WAN connections. The purpose of SD-WAN is to integrate every aspect and corner of an organisation. And cloud….well, it’s cloud. If you’ve managed to find this blog post without knowing what cloud is I think you may be lost. Try Googling ‘cat videos’ instead.

Cloud, cloud, cloud. IT departments just can’t get enough of it. And for obvious reasons; easier analytics, scalability, cheaper cost- I could spend all day going on about
how fabulous cloud is (and I have). It’s getting to the cloud that can be the problem.

Once upon a time, at the very beginning of the story of the internet, organisations would connect computers through an internal network to move data around the building. Then, with the ability to connect outside the building, came the problem. With business branches scattered across the globe, the ability to connect, share and collaborate has never been more important. But getting everything safely and securely from A to B can be an issue. Once you leave the confines of the building network, all bets are off. With the increase in cybercrime, the threat of sensitive information getting hacked, or- worse yet- having an unknown infiltrate the once-secure network through small gaps in your architecture becomes more likely.

The importance of the network might not always be clear. In fact, unless you really have enough time to sit and think about it, its purpose might never have crossed your mind. Being able to virtualise a number of network functions from a central point, creating an abstraction layer that is custom-built for each organisation and each user is the ultimate goal. But where does SD-WAN fit into all this? It’s been said that SD-WAN will be the vehicle to bring virtualisation to the network, and without it, virtualisation to the cloud or data centre will never be achieved. Think about it, in this day and age we live and work on the edge of the cloud. It’s not a fad, it’s here to stay. But what exactly is the ‘cloud’? Nothing more than several computers, storage and plenty of cooling systems that all connect together to the outside.

Digital transformation has become another big thing in the last few years. Organisations are falling over themselves to adopt or transition to this mass integration into all areas of their business, fundamentally changing the way they operate and deliver value to their customers. But all of these new ways of doing and thinking can’t be built on foundations that were designed and created well before the idea of cloud. SD-WAN allows a more agile take on digital transformation, creating a cost-effective infrastructure that enables the leverage for cloud. With this level of agility, sites and their teams are easier than ever to support, and it’s all thanks to SD-WAN.

Additionally, traditional WAN architectures haven’t been designed to support the fast-changing consumption model of apps efficiently. Legacy WANs are past their sell-by date. Plagued from being MPLS-based with low bandwidth per site, with limited visibility and, crucially, not built for cloud, time is up. Under current legacy WANs, when a user needs to access an app in the cloud, they will do a sort of shuffle around until they hit it. This can lead to wasted bandwidth, extra costs and higher packet loss and latency. Under the traditional WAN model, organisations tend to not be able to afford them when management can be rigid, complex and cause network changes to be lengthy, All in all, it results in numerous inefficiencies and an expensive operation model. Finding the right SD-WAN solution will eliminate all of these issues, while supporting the new app consumption model. This basically means that policies can be defined based on business intent, resulting in steering traffic to where the app actually resides without having to take unnecessary shuffles or compromising on security.

In essence, SD-WAN is cloud’s best friend. And with cloud fast becoming the future of most organisations, it will be your best friend too. Provisioning for SD-WAN will not only make your move to cloud easier, but also more efficient. Contact us today to hear what we can do to help your transition to cloud, or book a free business case assessment to see how your IT environment can be improved.

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Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.

 

Blog, Cloud Hosting, IT Solutions, Microsoft, Our Upcoming Events, Uncategorized

A Brief History of Azure


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You’d be hard pressed to imagine a modern world without Microsoft Azure. Since 2010, it has graced many a cloud strategy, promising to deliver an ever-expanding set of cloud services to help meet organisations’ business challenges. It’s safe to say that it provides full freedom to build, manage and deploy applications on a large scale, using plenty of tools and frameworks to achieve it. The inner workings of Azure were already in the planning stages in 2005. Hoping to bring disruption to internet services, Ray Ozzy, Chief Technical Officer and Chief Software Architect at Microsoft, insisted that Azure would bring “the effectiveness of a new delivery and adoption model” that would also create “the demand for compelling, integrated user experiences that ‘just work’.” 13 years later, and eight years after being released into the public domain, Azure has done just that.

When it comes to cloud computing, Microsoft offers all of the main categories that interest organisations; Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS). Microsoft, being Microsoft, has had every opportunity to innovate, diversify and establish Azure as a top-level fixture in the industry. Announced in October 2008 with codename ‘Project Red Dog’, it wasn’t always one of the Big Players in the world of cloud. Microsoft intended on launching a total of five key categories of cloud services, with Azure in the hot seat for compute, storage and networking; while incorporating Microsoft SQL Services for databases; .NET Services for developers, Live Services for filesharing and Microsoft SharePoint Services and Microsoft Dynamics CRM Services for SaaS offerings.

Take yourself back to 2010. It was the year that brought so many highs and lows for the country; Lady Gaga’s Bad Romance, the engagement announcement of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the brutal loss for England to host the 2018 World Cup (which evidently went to Russia). Originally called Windows Azure, it provided a service platform for SQL Services, .Net services and Live Services. Back then, the ‘cloud’ was a semi-obscure idea that some couldn’t really get their heads around. Honestly, the internet was a wacky idea in the 90s but in 2010 we’d largely accepted it as a fundamental human right, so being able to store data and access apps online wasn’t much of a stretch. But anyway. Because of that slight doubt, Azure didn’t know it, but it was on the cusp of a technological revolution- and it was at the right place at the right time to reap the rewards.

Unfortunately, in 2011 Azure had a slight hiccup. Still in its infancy, the documentation describing Azure services and capabilities was deemed incomprehensible, and its web-based interface was difficult to use. Thankfully, in May 2011 Scott Guthrie, former Corporate Vice President of the .Net platform at Microsoft, took over the Azure Application Platform team in order to shake things up a little and make some improvements. And he did! The user interface that was formerly a Silverlight application was changed to a HTML5 web portal, which improved things drastically and made the whole platform feel more like a systematised set of services. Adding support for quite a wide variety of programming languages, frameworks and operating systems (including, surprisingly, Linux) propelled Azure into a new, more innovative age. By 2014, Azure had made significant leaps in user experience. Becoming a cloud platform known for being robust and comprehensive for IaaS and PaaS cloud computing models. By continuing to expand its cloud capabilities, it has increased its support for open source software, making Azure the first choice for organisations that don’t even run Windows. In the years that followed, Azure has gone from strength to strength, developing significantly since 2008. The platform has seen only a few major outages in its history, creating an impressive reputation of reliability in a world where even five minutes of downtime can mean hundreds of thousands in loss of profits for organisations.

Back to 2018; Microsoft Azure enjoys a very mature, stable and reliable reputation as a secure public cloud provider, holding the title of second-largest IaaS and PaaS provider (behind Amazon Web Services) in the world. We are proud to work with Microsoft, obviously a huge name in the world of IT in its own right, but also with Azure. We regularly incorporate the platform as part of a business challenge solution as its flexibility and dependability are second to none. We hope this blog post has piqued your interest in the opportunities that Azure can open. If you want to keep up-to-date with what’s going on with Citrix, make sure to keep an eye on our events page where we regularly share workshops and webinars to keep you in the know!

 

Directors-9619Missy Beaudelot – Digital Marketing Executive
With a background in journalism and an interest in all things tech, Missy keeps our social media in check while monitoring our websites and developing our digital presence.